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Marble     |     Travertine     |     Slate     |    Granite   |    Limestone   |    Porcelain
Marble
Marble is a metamorphic Stone, which means it is made up of limestone that was exposed to intense pressure and high temperatures over a long period of time. This causes the material to go through a molten phase, which allows minerals to come in and give marble the distinct swirls and veins. Marble is of medium hardness and is Ideal for Bathrooms, floors, foyers, and fireplace surrounds. Marble has also been used for centuries for making monuments and statues and is still the top choice for stone sculptures. With the beautiful patterns and amazing polish marble can bring elegance to your home. Marble is found in wonderful places around the world such as: Italy, Canada, Spain Greece, and many more. Like granite, marble quarries can be known for a specific color.

Care and Maintenance

While Marble is a very durable stone, when the finish is polished one must take care to prolong the finish. Standing water will cause the finish to fade. When using polished marble as a countertop you must be careful not to leave anything that might cause stains from rust, Chemicals, or food. Harm to the polish can also be caused by acidic food, that could etch the finish over time, and you should never use

Stone Care text is provided by: Stone Profit Systems



Granite
Granite is a very versatile material that is great for many applications. It is an Igneous Rock that was formed by volcanic activity, and is made up of molten that cooled beneath the earth's surface. This type of stone can be quarried from Italy, United States, India, Brazil, and many other exotic places around the world. Stone from each location will have colors and patterns exclusive to that quarry. Granite can come in a Varity of different colors and patterns. Most Granite appear to be made up of flakes, while some can be veined like marble. Granite is particularly a very hard type of stone which makes it very resistant to wear and tear in turn this material is great for countertops indoors and out. Granite can also be used in applications such as walk ways and wall cladding depending on the type of finish that is applied. This material can be polished to a smooth reflective surface or it can be honed, Leathered, or flamed depending on the use.

Care and Maintenance

Granite is slightly porous, and should be sealed with a high quality stone sealer. Sealing a stone surface is not difficult, or expensive. Because there are several types of stone sealer, it would be best to talk to your fabricator or builder to see what product they recommend. The process to seal a stone surface is to, clean the stone with a mild detergent that does not contain ammonia and allow it to dry for several hours. The next step would be to apply the sealer product according to the directions and wipe off the excess as instructed. It is time to reseal your stone when water will not bead up on the surface. When cleaning stone, there are a couple of do's and don’ts. Don’t use any products with ammonia, strong caustics, or solvents such as Windex. Ammonia will remove the sealer, and strong caustic cleaners will do the same.

Stone Care text is provided by: Stone Profit Systems



Slate
Slate is a very dense fine grained metamorphic rock formed by the metamorphism of shale and clay under lower pressures and temperatures. It is also soft, and if not careful it can be easily scratched. Most Slate is gray and/or black, but some slate can appear red or purple depending on its mineral content. In most cases Slate will not have a high polish unless coating in applied. The stone's high clay content can make it flake and spall.

Care and Maintenance

Slate should be treated with a good quality silicone penetrating sealer that repels oils. Because of the cleft planes that are common in slate, the stone should not be pressure washed at pressures above 800 PSI. Spills should be cleaned up immediately with cleaners that do not contain acid. Do not use: bathroom cleaners, grout cleaners, bleach, ammonia or other general purpose cleaners. Slate should be cleaned with a specific cleaner. Speak with your fabricator for their recommendations.

Stone Care text is provided by: Stone Profit Systems



Travertine
Although it is talked about less, travertine is one of the most frequently used stones in modern architecture. Its applications can include wall cladding, facade Materials, flooring , and more. Travertine is a sedimentary stone that is a form of limestone. Naturally, pure travertine is white, but because of impurities caused by rivers and springs we get golden brown, and yellow colors. These impurities, mainly Iron or other organic compounds left behind by the water, are also responsible for the colored bands and rings that we see in travertine. Travertine can be obtained in three different finishes: Tumbled, filled, and unfilled, Tumbled travertine and a weathered aged look that is created by tumbling the stone with other bits of stone, sand, and steel bearings. The filled finish is smooth and can be polished to a high gloss. Unfilled is more natural looking that filled because the tiny pits and pores are not filled in with epoxy like they are in the previous finish.

Care and Maintenance

Travertine is etched by acids, so spills with acidic foods including soft drinks and juice should be cleaned up immediately. Travertine should only be cleaned with neutral or mild alkaline-based cleaners. Acid-based cleaning chemicals can also etch the surface. Travertine absorbs oils and other liquids and is more easily stained than marble. So putting Travertine in a kitchen or heavily used bathroom is not a good idea. Like the other materials, it is recommended to seal travertine with a sealer. Talk to your fabricator or builder to get the best recommendations.

Stone Care text is provided by: Stone Profit Systems



Limestone
Limestone is a sedimentary rock that consist mainly of calcite and also contains calcareous remains of plants and animals. Limestone is a relatively soft stone. Therefore, it should be protected by using cutting boards when using knives, and by using place mats and trivets should be placed under ceramic dishes, and anything that is hot. It comes in neutral colors such as black, grey, white, yellow or brown. The stone is often used for flooring, wall cladding, counter tops, and fireplaces. Limestone usually comes in a finish that is honed or not polished. If the limestone is dense enough it can be polished, but not to the same sheen as granites and marbles.

Care and Maintenance

Limestone, like marble, is sensitive to acids. One should not use acidic cleaning products, or should avoid leaving lemon or tomato juice to stand on the surface. if the acidic product is allowed to set the stone will etch, causing the color to fade and the texture to change. Lime stone is more porous than most other counter top surfaces, so it is easily stained if it is not sealed. All limestone should be treated with a penetrating stone sealer before installation. even after sealing the limestone it is important to clean up any spills immediately. Speak with your fabricator for their recommendations.

Stone Care text is provided by: Stone Profit Systems



Porcelain
Porcelain tiles are ceramic tiles that are made up of clay with specific properties to make the water absorption of 0.5% or less. Porcelain comes both glazed and unglazed. The pits and pores that exist in porcelain are filled in with a liquid glass that is baked into the surface when it is glazed. Glazed can be easier to clean, but unglazed have better slip resistance. Porcelain comes in a range of hardness and durability. There is a PEI rating that identifies what type of areas the porcelain tiles should be used in. The PEI rating ranges from class 0, which should only be used on walls so that there is no foot traffic, through class 5 which allows for heavy foot traffic like walk ways.

Care and Maintenance

For Glazed porcelain it is not necessary to apply a sealer to the tile, but is recommended to seal the grout between the tile. Unglazed porcelain should be sealed with a penetrating sealer on the tile itself as well as the grout. The surface should be swept, vacuumed, and dusted regularly. To clean further a mild cleaning solution and water should be used with a mop or sponge. The porcelain should then be rinsed with water to remove any film the cleaner might have left behind.

Stone Care text is provided by: Stone Profit Systems